• April 11, 2012 • RECENTLY I PURCHASED a look-alike figurine of the Kent Art Ware “standing draped female”. (in each of the three photos the look-alike figurine is on the right) At first glance they appear to be identical except for the right hand, hair bun and the front garment folds. But there are additional differences as well. Two of them can be seen in the center photo – the lack of definition in the look-alike’s pulled back hair and her thicker wrist and forearm.

Original Kent Art Ware piece on the left; look-alike on the right

Original KAW piece on the left; look-alike on the right

KAW on the left and look-alike standing draped female detail

KAW on the left and look-alike standing draped female detail

I think this look-alike was made in a Kent Art Ware mold…a well worn mold that had seen better days…a mold with damage to the figure’s hair bun and to her right hand which was rather clumsily repaired. I also think the factory who made the look-alike was the same that made KAW, Moriyama Pottery. Look at the word “Japan” on the underside of the look-alike. It is the same style, size, and color of the word Japan in Kent Art Ware’s mark.

KAW on the left and look-alike standing draped female marks

 

KAW on the left and look-alike standing draped female marks 1

Once again, this points to the practice of one brand copying other brands figurines with impunity; whatever is selling well gets copied. I’m betting this was business as usual for many figurine makers the world over before the Second World War. At least in this Art Deco era example they didn’t copy the brand name mark along with the item. Is there still copying of decorative ceramic items going on? In China most definitely. Elsewhere probably not so much in our time of vigilant corporate lawyers and punitive lawsuits.